This is the multi-fandom and general life blog of a 26-year-old asexual Canadian bibliophile.

Once I tried to keep track of all the fandoms I can/will blog about at the drop of a hat, but there were too many so I gave up. Sorry.

I'm also enamoured of food, puns, history, photography, and adorable animals.

Feel free to talk to me either here on tumblr, or on skype, where I am brillig_and (let me know who you are first if you want to add me on skype though)

 

Roomba is happily whirring around sucking up dirt and Molly is alternately keening in distress/trying to climb up into my lap, and barking at it.

clgdoublelifts:

okay but how about this

tiny mythology

a centaur who barely makes it up to your waist but hates when you point that out

a mermaid who spends her time splashing around in your sink

a gryphon who spends all her time flying in circles around your head

a six-inch basilisk that makes you feel a little dizzy if you look it in the eye

PEBBLE GOLEMS

MOUSE-SIZED UNICORNS

AN ASURA WHO’S ONLY A FEW INCHES TALL SO HE SETTLES FOR REARRANGING AROUND THE STUFF ON YOUR DESK WHILE YOU SLEEP

A DRAGON THE SIZE OF YOUR CAT THAT CAN STILL BREATHE FIRE THAT MELTS STEEL IN SECONDS

TINY MYTHICAL CREATURES

gehayi:

youmightbeamisogynist:

naamahdarling:

mythosidhe:

Although I have to point out that there was a piece of speculative science fiction called The Blazing World published by one Margaret Cavendish, Duchess of Newcastle-upon-Tyne in 1666, slightly predating Mary Shelley.

This is the thing. Women have been doing awesome shit since there was awesome shit to do, we’ve BEEN THERE, if anyone bothered to look.

Oh, they looked. And then maliciously and willfully erased us from the books to keep anyone else from “getting ideas.”

Hell, the first named author in history? Enheduanna, a Sumerian high priestess, poet and lyricist. She’s known as the Shakespeare of Sumerian literature.

gehayi:

youmightbeamisogynist:

naamahdarling:

mythosidhe:

Although I have to point out that there was a piece of speculative science fiction called The Blazing World published by one Margaret Cavendish, Duchess of Newcastle-upon-Tyne in 1666, slightly predating Mary Shelley.

This is the thing. Women have been doing awesome shit since there was awesome shit to do, we’ve BEEN THERE, if anyone bothered to look.

Oh, they looked. And then maliciously and willfully erased us from the books to keep anyone else from “getting ideas.”

Hell, the first named author in history? Enheduanna, a Sumerian high priestess, poet and lyricist. She’s known as the Shakespeare of Sumerian literature.

(Source: dovsherman)

thursdayplaid:

clumsyoctopus:

flower language has always been an intense source of disappointment for me

like, they all mean really generic things like “love” or “forever” or “i’m sorry” 

i thought you could combine flowers

like you could just send someone a bouquet and from the combination of hibiscus and posies and tulips they’d understand “the rebel leader is dead, rendezvous at the docks at 8, bring the dog, you will need lighter fluid and  a large tomato”

I really hope no one’s answered this for you yet, I saw this and got so excited that my obscure knowledge base might come into use.  I had to stretch a few flowers so to speak but Victorian flower language allows for alteration in meaning depending on colour, fruit, flower, bud, steam, leaves and thorns, so I didn’t feel I was too far out of line.  This message would work best as two bouquets bound together.  First red Nasturtium with no leaves (red denotes a leader, the nasturtium a patriot) mixed with white or red Mask Flowers (rebellion, red if you want to emphasize fighting, white martyrdom) around Cypress (death).  Then Chick weed (rendezvous) and Blue Convolvulus (night) surrounded by eight White Popular Leaves (symbolises the time: eight), Yellow Iris (flame, and a flower that grows by rivers) and Yellow Prarie Dock Flowers (this was closest I could find to docks)and one large Tomato Leaf, all bound in Dogwood Bark.  Dogwood represents deceit, but as far as I could find the bark wasn’t used symbolically, and as you referred to the dog instead of a dog, I thought it was likely the pun should be a dead giveaway.  

So there’s your rebel message!

(Source: cephalodogs)

mediumaevum:

Caerphilly Castle is one of the great medieval castles of western Europe. Several factors give it this title: its immense size (1.2h), making it the largest in Britain after Windsor, its large-scale use of water for defense and the fact that it is the first truly concentric castle in Britain. Of the time of its building in the late 13th century, it was a revolutionary masterpiece of military planning.
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image (x)

mediumaevum:

Caerphilly Castle is one of the great medieval castles of western Europe. Several factors give it this title: its immense size (1.2h), making it the largest in Britain after Windsor, its large-scale use of water for defense and the fact that it is the first truly concentric castle in Britain. Of the time of its building in the late 13th century, it was a revolutionary masterpiece of military planning.

More

image (x)

mauditcajun:

akalle:

Rare vintage photograph of an onna-bugeisha, one of the female warriors of the upper social classes in feudal Japan (emerged before Samurai)
An onna-bugeisha (女武芸者?) was a type of female warrior belonging to the Japanese upper class. Many wives, widows, daughters, and rebels answered the call of duty by engaging in battle, commonly alongside samurai men. They were members of the bushi (samurai) class in feudal Japan and were trained in the use of weapons to protect their household, family, and honor in times of war. They also represented a divergence from the traditional “housewife” role of the Japanese woman. They are sometimes mistakenly referred to as female samurai, although this is an oversimplification. Onna bugeisha were very important people in ancient Japan. Significant icons such as Empress Jingu, Tomoe Gozen, Nakano Takeko, and Hōjō Masako were all onna bugeisha who came to have a significant impact on Japan.

Reblogging cause I have way too many dumbasses telling me historically women were never warriors. Uneducated fuckwits

mauditcajun:

akalle:

Rare vintage photograph of an onna-bugeisha, one of the female warriors of the upper social classes in feudal Japan (emerged before Samurai)

An onna-bugeisha (女武芸者?) was a type of female warrior belonging to the Japanese upper class. Many wives, widows, daughters, and rebels answered the call of duty by engaging in battle, commonly alongside samurai men. They were members of the bushi (samurai) class in feudal Japan and were trained in the use of weapons to protect their household, family, and honor in times of war. They also represented a divergence from the traditional “housewife” role of the Japanese woman. They are sometimes mistakenly referred to as female samurai, although this is an oversimplification. Onna bugeisha were very important people in ancient Japan. Significant icons such as Empress Jingu, Tomoe Gozen, Nakano Takeko, and Hōjō Masako were all onna bugeisha who came to have a significant impact on Japan.

Reblogging cause I have way too many dumbasses telling me historically women were never warriors. Uneducated fuckwits

oldcanada:

Hamilton, ON 1854
A view of Hamilton, Canada West, from the mountain, 1854. Hand-coloured lithograph by Edwin Whitefield (1816-1892).
You can clearly see they are overlooking the harbour area from the mountain. Obviously today you would see the skyway also.
Source: Edwin Whitefield, National Archives of Canada, C- 42294

oldcanada:

Hamilton, ON 1854

A view of Hamilton, Canada West, from the mountain, 1854. Hand-coloured lithograph by Edwin Whitefield (1816-1892).

You can clearly see they are overlooking the harbour area from the mountain. Obviously today you would see the skyway also.

Source: Edwin Whitefield, National Archives of Canada, C- 42294